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12 Peers:

A Round Table Conversation Where New Thinking Leverages Your Creativity!

 
SUBMIT YOUR SCREENPLAY SYNOPSIS

Paladin Pictures is looking for three low-budget films to fill out our slate of upcoming productions. Do you have a completed screenplay that tells a great story and is worth being made into a film? If so, please consider submitting your synopsis for consideration (500 word maximum). If we like your synopsis, we may request your screenplay. If we like your screenplay, we may purchase it from you to turn it into a film.



SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

  • You must have a completed screenplay with a clean chain of title (meaning that it is 100% your original work and that no one else can claim ownership to any portion of the work).
  • The film must be able to be made for less than $1 Million dollars.
  • No Period Pieces - Must be set in Present Day
  • The film must fit the Paladin Mission… “Paladin Pictures is committed to the creation of redemptive entertainment and thought-provoking cultural critique.” Your storyline must have some type of redeeming nature or thought-provoking cultural elements.
  • No Science Fiction, No Horror/Thriller, No Animation
  • Must be submitted by 31 DEC 2017
  • By submitting your synopsis to Paladin Pictures you agree to the following:

I am submitting to you herewith and under the terms and conditions stated herein the following material (hereinafter referred to as the “Material”):

I acknowledge that because of your position in the entertainment industry you receive numerous solicited and unsolicited submissions of ideas, formats, stories, suggestions and the like, and that many such submissions heretofore or hereafter received by you are similar to or identical to those developed by you or your employees or to those otherwise available to you. Further, I acknowledge that you have adopted the policy, with respect to unsolicited submission of material, of refusing to accept, consider or review such material unless the person submitting such material has signed an agreement in form substantially the same as this. Accordingly, I acknowledge that you would refuse to accept, consider or otherwise review the Material in the absence of my acceptance of each and all provisions of this agreement (“Agreement”). I acknowledge that no fiduciary or confidential relationship now exists between you and me, and I further acknowledge that no such relationships are established between you and me by reason of this Agreement or by reason of my submission to you of the Material.

In consideration of your receipt of the Material, I hereby agree to execute this Agreement. I acknowledge that you have no obligations to me except as set forth in this Agreement, and that no other obligations exist or shall exist or shall be deemed to exist. I further acknowledge that at this time you have no intent to compensate me in anyway and I have no expectation of receiving any compensation. I acknowledge that you are under no obligation to review or use or negotiate with me with respect to the Material in any manner.

I acknowledge that the Material is submitted by me voluntarily and not in confidence, and that no confidential relationship is intended or created between us by reason of the submission of the Material. I agree that nothing contained in this Agreement nor the fact of my submission of the Material to you shall be deemed to place you in a position different from that of, or to cause you to have any fewer rights than, a member of the general public to whom I have not submitted the Material.

I acknowledge that materials (or portions thereof) developed, created, acquired, licensed or otherwise obtained by you, or third party materials to which you have had access, may be similar or identical to the Material (or portions thereof) in theme, idea, plot, format and/or other respects. I agree that I will not be entitled to any compensation because of the use of any such similar or identical material. I acknowledge that materials developed by you may contain similarities to the Material. I hereby waive, and agree that I will never make, any claim or demand or bring any action against you in connection with the use of the Material. In this connection, I hereby release and absolutely and forever discharge you of and from any and all claims, damages, legal fees, costs, expenses, debts, actions and causes of action of every kind and nature whatsoever, whether now known or unknown, suspected or unsuspected, asserted or unasserted, which I now have, or at any time heretofore ever had or which I may have in the future, against you which in any way arise out of or in connection with the Material.

Each party hereby waives any and all rights and benefits which he or it might otherwise have or be entitled to under the laws of Virginia to litigate any dispute in court, it being the intention of the parties to arbitrate, according to the provisions hereof, all such disputes, as the sole and exclusive means to resolve any such disputes. Any such dispute may be submitted to arbitration in the County of Albemarle, Commonwealth of Virginia, in accordance with the rules and regulations of the American Arbitration Association then in effect, provided that said arbitration shall be heard before a single arbitrator, selected pursuant to said rules and regulations. Said arbitrator shall be well acquainted with the entertainment business. The arbitrator’s decision shall be controlled by the terms and conditions of this Agreement and shall be final and binding. Judgment upon the award of the arbitrator may be enforced in any court of competent jurisdiction. The prevailing party shall be entitled to recover from the losing party, in addition to all other relief to which it may be entitled, its costs and expenses, including, without limitation, actual attorneys’ fees and the costs of expert witnesses. In the event of any dispute concerning this Agreement, my sole remedy shall be to seek actual damages and in no event shall I be entitled to seek injunctive or other equitable relief.

By clicking the link below, I hereby state that I have read and understand this Agreement; that no oral representations of any kind have been made to me; that there are no prior or contemporaneous oral agreements in effect between us pertaining to the Material; and that this Agreement states our entire understanding.

Reminder: Synopsis (500 words max) must be submitted by 31 DEC 2017.

Do not submit your screenplay. You will be contacted if selected. Thank you!

This link will prepare an email for your submission.

BY CLICKING THIS LINK TO SUBMIT MY SYNOPSIS I AGREE TO THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS ABOVE

Paladin Media Group presents our Paladin Video Primer series. This is a series of videos designed to direct and inform clients in the world of production. The second video we introduce to you is called The Teleprompter.

It can be difficult to memorize words in front on a camera, so what's the solution? Well, at Paladin Media Group, we believe a teleprompter is! A teleprompter is a piece of angled glass that fits directly in front of a lense of the camera. It reflects a reverted image of your script, allowing you to read it outloud and delever your message flawlessly. However there comes some challenges while reading from a teleprompter, watch our video to learn more about them!

If you do have a project that needs a teleprompter, please give Paladin Media Group a call. We would love to help.

 

The Art of Closed Captioning

Closed captioning is an art form. A very overlooked art form, perhaps, but an art form nonetheless. By elevating something as mundane as monospaced characters on the screen that only a small portion of our population ever see to the level of art, it helps us understand the real value of the process and it helps us value good captioning over poor captioning.

At Paladin Media Group, we recently created a video to explain why you should caption all of your videos. You can see it here. So in this post I won’t get into the higher SEO and broader audience (far beyond the hearing impaired) that captions afford your video. Instead, the purpose of this post is to discuss some of the intricacies of captioning that you may not be familiar with. For example, onomatopoeias. Go ahead and say it, it’s just a fun word to pronounce. Onomatopoeias are the written description of sound effects. So the onomatopoeia of “door opens” might be “creak” or “creeaaaak” depending on the actual sound effect used in the film.

A study was conducted by Gallaudet University that showed that “a combination of description and onomatopoeia was the preference of more consumers (56%) than was description alone (31%) or onomatopoeia alone (13%).” This means that when captioning your project you should include the description of the sound effect, which appear in all lowercase letters enclosed in brackets, like this [gun fire], as well as the artists interpretation of the sound effect, bam-bam—bam, or plink-plink—plink, or poof-poof—poof, depending on the actual sound of the gun. When making up spellings of these sound effects you can see where you might want to employ a creative brain over a sterile one.

Another subtle detail of Closed Captions is the hyphen. When should you use a single hyphen and when should you use two? There are specific rules for this, too. How should you space your captions? What if there is on-screen text where captions typically are placed? What if a voice is heard off camera? What about a character screaming? All of these are handled in a manner that a true caption artist will handle appropriately and consistently.

At Paladin most of the material we caption is between 3 and 5 minutes long, often times they are pretty simple with a single person being interviewed, but we recently set out to caption an 85-minute documentary film. Part of this film includes protests, street preachers, and angry crowds. Fortunately, with captions you can rely on the pictures of the film to help set the seen, but really trying to set the mood of the soundtrack through text on screen can be a huge challenge.

As we set out to accomplish this, we realized that the short videos we had previously captioned were very limited compared to the types of things we would encounter in a feature-length film. In our research we came across an incredibly valuable document that was created by the Described and Captioned Media Program. This downloadable pdf will give you an incredible amount of insight into the Art of Captioning. So whether you are setting out to caption your own video or if you’re just interested in the world of captioning, take a look at this great resource.

If you do have a project that needs captioning and don’t intend to do it yourself, please give Paladin Media Group a call. We would love to help.

Kent C. Williamson is a filmmaker, the founder of Paladin Media Group, and the father of six kids. His current documentary is Stained Glass Rainbows.

TRAILER: By War & By God

In 2008 I made my first trip to Vietnam with an organization called Vets With A Mission. These Vietnam veterans all have war stories that will make your heart stop. The hell of war leaves it's mark... sometimes in the form of physical scars, but almost always in the form of mental scars. What's amazing about this particular group of veterans is their committment to reconciliation; between themselves and the people of Vietnam, between themselves and the land, and between themselves and God. The reason they return to that beautiful country is to love, serve, and care for the people there. These men have all been shaped By War & By God.

Here's the first look at the trailer for the film we at Paladin Pictures are currently producing on behalf of the Community Films Foundation and Vets With A Mission. The film is being edited by James Burgess with an original score by Will Musser.

 

 

Learn more at Vets With A Mission.

Paladin Media Group presents our Paladin Video Primer series. This is a series of videos designed to direct and inform clients in the world of production. The first video we introduce to you is Closed Captioning.

Why is it important to add closed captions to videos? Well, at Paladin Media Group, we believe it not only aids to the hearing impaired, but to everyone. Adding captions can also increase your website traffic, page views and even your search rank, enabling your video to have a better chance of appearing in the search results. 

If you do have a project that needs captioning and don’t intend to do it yourself, please give Paladin Media Group a call. We would love to help.

Here's a link to another Closed Captioning blog post!

 

Paige Pitstick is the Production Office Administrator for Paladin Media Group, a film and video production company located in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Marketing Reach Using Personalized Video

What a simple but brilliant use of video!

The UVA Health System decided to make an investment in video. With Paladin Media Group as their partner, a simple decision has given consumers a “taste”.

With more than 1200 doctors in the UVA Health System, how in the world do you choose? All of the doctors have impressive resumes, but there is so much more to a patient-doctor relationship.  

Let’s think about how people make choices—First, the Health System itself is a draw, but the Health System is only as good as those that work there. Ok, so second, we look at Doctor resumes—they all are top notch, that’s why the Health System has the reputation it does.  Maybe we feel more comfortable with a female doctor vs a male?  Maybe we want a younger doctor, thinking that he/she might have more insight on the “latest” treatment options, or maybe we feel more comfortable with years of experience—either way, all we have left is their name or what they look like.  

It reminds me of how some people say they choose wine—first they choose red or white, then they choose the type of blend they like, and of course, now the price range, but once those choices are made—you still haven’t had a taste!  So, many say they choose based on how much they like the design of the label!  

UVA Health System with Paladin’s production expertise has been able to remove that last barrier—now you can have a “taste”! Using video, Paladin has interviewed doctors and produced short pieces that reveal what’s inside! Doctors talk about their specialties, and things they find rewarding. It just shows consumers that there is a way to get to know a little bit more when faced with such an important decision. Something that can’t be done from just a “picture”—so maybe if a picture is “worth a thousand words”—video is totally worth the investment!

Elizabeth Vagnoni is the Senior Producer for Paladin Media Group, a film and video production company located in Charlottesville, Virginia

© 2015 Paladin Pictures, Inc. All Rights Reserved
How Freelancers Create A Business Advantage

Project based businesses are pretty difficult to staff properly, not to mention creatively. It’s an interesting paradox -- clients want to “know” that a company they are working with is solid and has full time employees. On the other hand -- in order to be competitive, production companies sometimes need to contract at the end of a project.

So where’s the balance?

The nature of the business of marketing/advertising/production is usually driven by the ebb and flow of projects. Projects are defined by budget, time needed, and staff/crew required. Staff key players that embody the values of the company are critical to ensure that the direction of a project, the interaction between client and agency, and overall vision is on track and exceeding client expectations. The addition of select freelancers can give businesses an edge by creating an opportunity to choose the right players for each project. Not all projects have the same requirements. For example, some projects are more art driven, some projects need motion designers, some projects are dialogue driven and need to be produced and directed more like a small feature film. Each project/idea that comes to Paladin has it’s own set of requirements needed to make it unique. It’s not really in the best interest of our clients to staff every project with the same “eyes”. We make it our business to know how to put together a team that employs not only the “best” in the business, but the most appropriate talent for any given project.

In our experience, while lots of people are really good at what they do -- not everybody is good at everything! So finding freelancers that provide techniques, skills or perspectives that you don’t have -- is really good business, especially if it means creating an exceptional product vs an expected product for your client.

Elizabeth Vagnoni is the Senior Producer for Paladin Media Group, a film and video production company located in Charlottesville, Virginia

© 2015 Paladin Pictures, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Is Video On Your Website Important?

The following is content from a speech Dan Fellows gave to the Central Virginia chapter of the American Marketing Association in the Spring of 2015.

Is video on your website important?

How many of you remember when you got your first TV?

  • I was 7 and it was a black and white 19" with rabbit ears and a knob to turn to change the channels.
  • Since that time we have lived in a video media world.

How many of you remember your first interaction on the internet?

  • I was forty-five!

The Paradigm shifted again and is morphing at an accelerated rate. Some people say we are now in WEB 2.0. and Video Content is King:

    • It is estimated that by 2020 video will account for 75% of all consumer internet traffic
    • 190 million unique YouTube viewers each month in the US
    • 100 global brands collect 800 million YouTube Views each Month
    • YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world

So what are the benefits to having video on your website?

    • Delivers your message in a format that people like
    • 80% of people will watch video - only 20% will read content
    • Enhances engagement - it's STICKY
    • Doubles the amount of time spent on a website
    • 15% more time on blog posts with video than with just images and text
    • Drives Traffic to your site
    • 53% more likely to show up on the first page of a SEO search
    • 3X more natural inbound links/clicks
    • 200 - 300% more unique monthly site visits
    • 41% higher click thru rates
    • 4.8% conversion rate of websites with video versus 2.9% without video
    • Emotional - Important because emotion sells
    • 7 out of 10 people that watch a product video view the brand in a positive way
    • 50% say they are more confident buying a product on line if there is a video
    • Leaves a lasting impression
    • 74% increase in people’s understanding of your product.

Should you have video on your site?

    • 75% of B2B marketers say they will include video on their sites in 2015
    • 68% of the top 50 internet retailers use video on their sites

Only if you have a website and you want to keep up.

 

Sources for Statistics: Leo Merle, Marketing Programs Manager, Act-On; wirebuzz.com Blog; BoostSuite.com Blog

Dan Fellows is the Business Development Manager for Paladin Media Group, a film and video production company located in Charlottesville, Virginia.

© 2015 Paladin Pictures, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Our Approach to Filming In Schools

As one prepares to film on location, there are numerous details to take into consideration, including lighting, power requirements, room measurements, window and door placement, ceiling height, etc. But when someone prepares to film in a pre-school, kindergarten, or elementary school classroom environment, there are even more fine points to consider.

• How many students will occupy the space?

• Will Teachers’ Aids be available to assist with children?

• What materials are being taught and what is the best approach to capturing it on film?

• Will teachers be working with small or large groups or one-on-one with students?

• Will students act naturally with cameras pointed at them?

Years of filming in and around classroom environments has taught me that it is generally a good idea to take a few minutes prior to production to let the class warm-up to the camera and crew. We at Paladin do this by showing the camera to them, talking about the lens and the microphone, having them look through the viewfinder and letting them see their friends on the monitor. This only takes a few minutes, and it is amazing how quickly most children’s fears and inhibitions fade away.

Small groups of young students and one-on-one teacher-student interaction make for great moments on video. Larger groups can get a bit unruly, which may require additional work in the edit suite. If the goal is to capture specific interaction between teachers and their students, it can often be like attempting to catch lightning in a bottle. I prefer to have a minimum of two cameras rolling at all times to increase my odds of obtaining those precious words, those magical smiles, and those eyes of wonder and amazement.

The physical size of the classroom can also aid or hinder the filming experience. Medium sized rooms often work best as they provide room to move about, but not too much room for students to wander. It is nice to be able to film, and then rotate the lights on the stands to re-light with minimal adjustment for the next scene, as opposed to having to move the lights, stands, stingers, etc. to the other end of a large room. At the same time a room that is too small may cause light stands and cords to be in your shots. A phone call ahead of time to the teacher can let you know what to expect and if there are other options available.

When a film crew arrives on location it can often be like the circus has arrived in town. Vehicles, equipment, cases, and new faces are all cause for attention and distraction. People in the hallways of the school often want to know what is going on. Take time to tell them. Satisfy their curiosity and an onlooker may become someone willing to help wrangle a few of your extra students, or run a timely errand. Make sure extra space is available to stage the equipment, somewhere close by, yet away from the area of focus. Once shooting begins, it is critical that the crew become invisible, sort of the fly-on-the-wall with the camera, filming the magic of education as it happens.

Checking in at the front desk is a requirement at most schools in this day and age. It informs the school staff of your presence and helps you get the lay of the land. The secretaries and receptionists are normally very good at helping visitors acclimate to the environment. It is also a great idea to stop by the Principal’s office on the way to the shoot. Introduce the crew and tell them how excited you are to have access to their world for the day. Then get to work and be on your best behavior… lest you find yourself sitting in that dreaded chair just outside the Principal’s door!

 

Kent C. Williamson is an owner of the Paladin Media Group, a film and video production company located in Charlottesville, Virginia. As a grade school student at Dowell Elementary, he spent much of his time day-dreaming of ways to creatively film in a classroom environment.

© 2003-2015 Paladin Pictures, Inc. All Rights Reserved

 

We are the team to transform your concept into cinematic existence!
We are the team to transform your concept into cinematic existence!
Paladin Crew members behind the scenes managing audio and video.

The Crew At Work

Paladin Crew members behind the scenes managing audio and video.

Steve, Production Supervisor, working away transferring old media to new media for our customers.

Media Transfers

Steve, Production Supervisor, transferring old media to new media for clients like you!
Visit the Media Transfer Site
Melissa, Editor, hard at work editing Sandler Training testimonials.

Video Editing

Melissa, Editor, hard at work editing Sandler Training testimonials.
Paladin Crew making adjustments before filming a Nursing Pride video for the UVA Heath System.

Nursing Pride Project

Paladin Crew making adjustments before filming a Nursing Pride video for the UVA Heath System.
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Kent and Dan with our clients during the UVA Children’s Hospital location scout.

UVA Health System

Kent and Dan with our clients during the UVA Children’s Hospital location scout.
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Shooting an online video series “Heads Up!” for our client Head Coaching.

On Location

Shooting an online video series “Heads Up!” for our client Head Coaching.
Steve adjusting audio before filming a University of Virginia Educational video.

Audio Perfection

Steve adjusting audio before filming a University of Virginia Educational video.
Discussing the shooting details for the next University of Virginia’s Battle Building scene.

Attention to Detail

Discussing the shooting details for the next University of Virginia’s Battle Building scene.
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Paladin Crew filming at the University of Virginia Health System using a steadicam.

Steadicam Ready

Paladin Crew filming at the University of Virginia Health System using a steadicam.
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Director, Kent C. Williamson discussing logistics before filming at the UVA Health System.

Managing Logistics

Director, Kent C. Williamson discussing logistics before filming at the UVA Health System.
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This season we're now filming in 4K! Here are some of our new Blackmagic cameras are using.

Blackmagic 4K

This season we're now filming in 4K! Here are some of our new Blackmagic cameras are using.
Admiring our Paladin Media Group Box truck in the sunset.

Paladin Delivers!

Admiring our Paladin Media Group Box truck in the sunset.
Filming on location, while Tad Coffin shares the history of his saddle business.

Saddle Up!

Filming on location, while Tad Coffin shares the history of his saddle business.
Filming at the University of Virginia Health System’s beautiful Battle Building.

Battle Building Beauty

Filming at the University of Virginia Health System’s beautiful Battle Building.
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Testing the macro capabilities of one of our Blackmagic cameras.

Extreme Close Ups

Testing the macro capabilities of one of our Blackmagic cameras.

 PALADIN MEDIA GROUP | 673 Berkmar Court | Charlottesville | Virginia | 22901 | 434.817.2700 

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